Spending an Hour in Savasana Counts as Yoga.

The past couple of weeks have been difficult for me. I am grateful (immensely, eternally) for the presence of Best Guy, who keeps me grounded when my imagination flies away with me and when my worry spiral starts a-turnin'. He is a true Bright Spot in my life and I thank whoever is listening every day that we met that fateful day last September.

I am currently in the process of re-evaluating my financial strategies, which is a fancy way of saying dude I'm broke I need to make some money. As excited as I was to start this new job, the fact that the only time I ever get any work is when all the other therapists go on vacation is killing my enthusiasm. They keep telling me that they've never been this slow and it will pick up, but I cannot wait until Fall Foliage Season to start making money. The bills that I have due now are pretty specific on that. So I have been floating next steps and ideas and theories around, when I am not otherwise engaged being depressed because I haven't left the house in two days and WHY WON'T BAUER FRIGGIN SHUT UP.
I am generally against the muzzling of animals, but at 3am I tend to change my stance on the topic.

Ahem.

So this morning, I went into my woo-woo room with the intention of getting a proper meditation going. After sitting there for about five minutes, I realized what I really wanted to do was lay down. So I did. For the better part of the hour. I suppose you could call it Restorative Savasana. I lay down on some large flat pillows and used a bolster under my knees and the meditation cushion for a pillow. I covered myself in a blanket and put an eye pillow over my eyes. And for the next little while, I floated with the music.

Savasana (or corpse pose) is often called the most difficult pose in yoga. How is laying on the floor difficult you ask? Well, firstly, the pose asks you to let go and let the floor support you... completely. No holding, no effort, no being ready to jump off the floor at a moment's notice. Just complete release. I can tell you from my massage practice just how difficult it is for most people to let go that completely. I have lost count of the number of times people have informed me how relaxed they are even though they are so wired they are practically hovering over the table.

Secondly, Savasana asks that in addition to letting go of your physical body, you let go of your thoughts, too. No thinking about your post-yoga class commute home, or what you need to pick up at the grocery store, or even your next blog post. Yet - and this is the kicker - you can't fall asleep either. 

Savasana asks a lot of things out of you, which is I think why a surprising number of yoga students will skip this most important end-of-class ritual. It is slowing down. Stopping. No more running so you don't have to face all the things you are running from. We as a society are not so good at that. We run and go and think and do until something (usually an accident or illness) forces us to stop. And listen. 

So this morning, I stopped. I listened. I nurtured myself for a little while. Did I have any revelations? Not really. But I did get some relief. For an hour, the worry stopped. The spiral stopped. There were no what-ifs, no oh no's, no how will I's. Just the Earth supporting me and the music soothing me. 

So yes, an hour of Savasana counts as yoga. Blissful, joyous, deep, painful, heart-opening yoga. 

Namaste.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

One Week Later.

Community. Now, More Than Ever.

Beck